Lewis’s discussion on the usefulness or uselessness of the word “Christian” really gave me much to think about. First, a Christian, says Lewis, is someone who accepts the teaching of the apostles. His famous illustration of a door which opens up into a hall with other doors which lead to fireplaces with sitting chairs next them is a powerful reminder that varying Christian traditions though different belong together under one roof. And while its valuable to appreciate mere-Christianity or aka catholicity, this is not where one aught to stay. We must all move into a room, sit by the fire, and converse. Perhaps even some of us will sit in many rooms and enjoy many conversations…

But what we can’t do is just remain in the hall appreciating the rooms from afar, nor can we enter the house without acceptance of the apostles teaching. Here’s what’s been hanging with from this audio lecture – catholicity can become an inhospitable chamber room without the particularity of traditions from which to choose and explore. Its luster and value fads not in the presence of theological differences but rather in their absence. I’ll be thinking upon this for the rest of the week because catholicity often operates in a flatening way in my life. I draw with broad brush-strokes rather than appreciating the mosaic unity of the traditions in the midst of their diversity…