This was my first “Keynote” Mac lead adult class I’ve done and I really enjoyed using Keynote. Keynote is a huge step up from Power Point, it allows you to manipulate so much of your presentation. The class I’m leading currently is on “Faith and Culture.” Week one was dedicated to an introduction to the nature of faith. I moved from a biblical discussion of what faith is using passages like Heb 11.1 & 1 Cor 2.6-11; to the apostolic churches use of the “regula fidei” principle; to the discussion the Medieval church had concerning faith and reason (particularly St. Anselm); up through Calvin’s view of faith which kind of brought us full circle back to the idea that faith while being belief and functioning as the foundation for understanding all of life isn’t true faith if it doesn’t move us to worship and piety. Here’s the bullet points from that talk;

EXPLORING THE NATURE OF FAITH FROM THE NT TO THE EARLY CHURCHES “RULE OF FAITH” TO THE MODERN USE OF CREEDS AND CONFESSIONS.

Faith is the evidence of things unseen (see Heb. 11.1).

Faith is hope for the hope-less based on the gospel (see Heb 11.1 in its wider context).

Faith is based upon the work of the Holy Spirit and is a gift/revelation from God (see 1 Cor 2.6-11).

The object of faith is God, not self (see 1 Cor 2.6-11).

Faith is doctrine; i.e. “the faith.” (see James 1.3)

“The faith” is a safe-guard against novel inventions (see Pelikan’s quote).

EXPLORING THE NATURE OF FAITH FROM SAINT AUGUSTINE TO SAINT ANSELM TO JOHN CALVIN.

Faith is intellectual; its a way of describing the real world (see Augustine).

BUT faith is not based on the world as we see it currently, faith is how we understand the world around us (see Anselm).

Faith is more than “historical knowledge” it’s a worshipful vision of God that is pietistic (see Calvin).

Next week we’ll be getting into what culture is. I’ll be relying on some of the things I’ve gleaned from Terry Eagleton, the British literary critic, about culture’s etymology streaching back to gardening metaphors; as well as Francis Schaffer’s helpful gaze into the nature of culture and the need for what he calls “substantial healing”; and landing finally at Andy Crouch’s insights in his new book “Culture Making.”

From there I’ll spend a week on discussing some of the models Christians have used to relate faith to culture, and then I’ll spend the next three weeks on big picture topics like “Faith in the Political Arena” or “Faith and the Arts” or “Faith and Ecology.”

I’m going to do my best to explore the tools and techniques available in Keynote. If any of you who are more seasoned in Macs have any tips don’t hesitate to comment them my way. Thanks in advance 🙂